Instructions

Accessories

Foot Straps

The foot straps are connected on either side of the baby carrier using the rings located on the belt. First attach each foot strap to its ring. With your baby properly seated in the baby carrier, put each foot through its strap. Adjust the height of the foot straps according to the position of the legs : the knees should be at the same level as the baby's bottom. The foot straps allow the lifting of the feet for a more comfortable seating.

HipGö

Shoulderless carrying

The HipGö connects itself to the sides of the baby carrier and goes around the wearer's back. To adjust tension and support, tighten the straps on both sides. The baby needs to be able to sit up by himself before the HipGö can be used to carry your child without using the shoulder straps.

Newborn safety

For the newborn's safety, up to 6 months old, when using the EvöAir, the HipGö can be attached on the sides of the baby carrier just like when using it without its shoulder straps, but this time without tightening the straps so as to avoid putting tension in the baby's back. The HipGö's purspose is only to keep the baby carrier closed to prevent the baby from falling on either side.

Sucking Pads

The sucking pads are attached to the baby carrier with snap buttons and can fit every style of baby carrier with shoulder straps, even those made by other companies.

Machine wash in lukewarm water in a delicate cycle using a mild soap, or hand wash using a no-rinse soap. Hang to dry or use your dryer's low tumble setting.

Leg Supports

Supports de jambe - EvöAir

Baby Carriers

Bambino

Since the baby carrier's fabrics and components have been transported and manipulated several times during manufacturing and its straps more slippery when brand new, the baby carrier should be washed before its first use. We recommend washing it by hand, ideally using no rince soap, or washing it in a garment bag using your washing machine's delicate cycle. and hanging it to dry. The baby carrier should not be ironed. You can use sucking pads to avoid washing it every day.

Tummy to tummy

Carrying a baby against the tummy offers him the comfort and reassurance needed for the development of his sense of emotional security. However, around the age of 12 months, this carrying position becomes more cumbersome and limits the freedom of movement of his carrier. It is also more difficult to carry a child against the stomach than on the back, but more comforting and reassuring.

On the hip

Since the baby carrier's fabrics and components have been transported and manipulated several times during manufacturing and its straps more slippery when brand new, the baby carrier should be washed before its first use. We recommend washing it by hand, ideally using no rince soap, or washing it in a garment bag using your washing machine's delicate cycle. and hanging it to dry. The baby carrier should not be ironed. You can use sucking pads to avoid washing it every day.

On the back

As soon as you feel comfortable doing it, your baby can be carried on your back. We recommend waiting until he is at least 6 months old or that he can sit by himself so as to avoid all risks of injury or suffocation. With the child's weight properly distributed on your back, shoulders and hips, this carrying position is more comfortable, especially as he grows and becomes heavier. It will give you more freedom in your activities, allowing you to do more demanding tasks without putting your child at risk. The Bämbino is a baby carrier specially designed for carrying heavier, taller children on your back.

Bambino Air

Since the baby carrier's fabrics and components have been transported and manipulated several times during manufacturing and its straps more slippery when brand new, the baby carrier should be washed before its first use. We recommend washing it by hand,ideally using no rince soap, or washing it in a garment bag using your washing machine's delicate cycle. and hanging it to dry. The baby carrier should not be ironed. You can use sucking pads to avoid washing it every day.

Tummy to tummy

Carrying a baby against the tummy offers him the comfort and reassurance needed for the development of his sense of emotional security. However, around the age of 12 months, this carrying position becomes more cumbersome and limits the freedom of movement of his carrier. It is also more difficult to carry a child against the stomach than on the back, but more comforting and reassuring.

On the hip

You can start carrying your baby on your hip as soon as he can hold up his head. This is an intermediate position which will give both you and your baby greater freedom of movement than on the tummy. Remember that without a baby carrier, we naturally carry a baby by holding him on our hip using one arm.

On the back

As soon as you feel comfortable doing it, your baby can be carried on your back. We recommend waiting until he is at least 6 months old or that he can sit by himself so as to avoid all risks of injury or suffocation. With the child's weight properly distributed on your back, shoulders and hips, this carrying position is more comfortable, especially as he grows and becomes heavier. It will give you more freedom in your activities, allowing you to do more demanding tasks without putting your child at risk. The Bämbino Air is a baby carrier specially designed for carrying heavier, taller children on the back.

EvöAir

Since the baby carrier's fabrics and components have been transported and manipulated several times during manufacturing and its straps more slippery when brand new, the baby carrier should be washed before its first use. We recommend washing it by hand using no rince soap and hanging it to dry. The baby carrier should not be ironed. You can use sucking pads to avoid washing it every day.

Tummy to tummy

0-6 months

Carrying your baby tummy to tummy is a position where the baby is held in a crouched position and is the most adequate method for carrying a newborn at least up to the age of 4 months. Your baby's back is kept well-rounded, as if still in the womb, while his knees are pulled upwards and his feet pointing down. This position is the same as when practicing skin-to-skin with your baby, which becomes possible as soon as he is at least 8 pounds, safely and easily. This crouched position will give him the comfort necessary to his sense of emotional security and is known to be beneficial to the development of his bones and joints. Before the age of 6 months, applying tension in the middle of the baby's back needs to be avoided. There are many tying techniques for you to experiment with to perfectly envelop your baby and support him in the ideal position for his stage of development.

6 months and up

Starting at 6 months and when your baby can sit by himself, his spine is sturdy enough to no longer need constant back support. Should he feel constrained, need to move, or feels too hot, you can allow him to free his arms from the wrap. Early on, we recommend the simplest of wraps, the 'cross carry', so you can gain confidence in the technique and in your skills. Another useful method is the 'Kangaroo', which will perfectly support his spine as a newborn. View our videos to discover all of the wrap's options!

On the hip

0-6 months

Carrying your baby tummy to tummy is a position where the baby is held in a crouched position and is the most adequate method for carrying a newborn at least up to the age of 4 months. Your baby's back is kept well-rounded, as if still in the womb, while his knees are pulled upwards and his feet pointing down. This position is the same as when practicing skin-to-skin with your baby, which becomes possible as soon as he is at least 8 pounds, safely and easily. This crouched position will give him the comfort necessary to his sense of emotional security and is known to be beneficial to the development of his bones and joints. From 0-1 months you can leave baby’s legs folded inside the baby carrier.  As soon as the baby begins to extend his legs and push into the bottom of the carrier, his legs should come out on either side.

Before the age of 6 months, applying tension in the middle of the baby's back needs to be avoided. When connecting the horizontal extension, make sure not to tighten the straps too much.

6 months and up

Starting at 6 months and when your baby can sit by himself, his spine is sturdy enough to no longer need back support. Should your baby feel constrained, too warm or in need of some freedom of movement, thanks to the HipGö you can remove the shoulder straps. You can also use the side fasteners instead of the belt's.

On the back

6 months and up

As soon as you feel comfortable doing it, your baby can be carried on your back. We nonetheless recommend to wait until he is at least 6 months old or that he can sit by himself so as to avoid all risks of injury or suffocation. With his weight properly distributed on your back, shoulders and hips, this carrying position is more comfortable, especially as he grows and becomes heavier. It will give you more freedom in your activities, allowing you to do more demanding tasks without putting your child at risk.

Facing the world

From 6 months and up

This carrying position needs your baby to be able to hold his head up by himself. It should be said that this position is not ideal, as it is less ergonomical than tummy-to-tummy and can be overly stimulating for your baby. Should you still like to use this position, keep its use to periods of 20 to 30 minutes at most and regularly verify your baby's blood flow to his legs. This is done by observing the colour of his skin, which should be pinkish rather than blueish. Should his feet get cold, this could also be a sign of difficulties with his blood circulation and you should set him in a different position. Make sure that his back is neither too flat nor too round, thus creating a bad inverted lumbar curve. Finally, his legs should not be hangong too low: to correct his position, tilt his pelvis as far forward as possible to move his knees as high up as possible and deepen his seating. There are two ways to position your baby facing out to the world, either with his legs inside the baby wrap or out and visible on either side.

How to use the accessories

The HipGö as lumbar support


Päno: putting it on, taking it off and transforming it

Multi 2.0

Since the baby carrier's fabrics and components have been transported and manipulated several times during manufacturing and its straps more slippery when brand new, the baby carrier should be washed before its first use. We recommend washing it by hand using no rince soap and hanging it to dry. Avoid using a washing machine as the straps could become tangled. The baby carrier should not be ironed. You can use sucking pads to avoid washing it every day.

Tummy to tummy

0-6 months

A belly-to-belly carry, where the baby is carried in a crouched position, is the most suitable carrying position for a newborn until at least 4 months. The back should be nicely rounded like in mom's belly, the knees well up and the feet down. You can practice the skin-to-skin technique with a baby of 8 lbs and more, easily and safely. This position provides the comfort needed to develop a sense of emotional security. The squatting position is known for its benefits for the development of the baby's bones and joints. Before 6 months, the newborn seat should be used to support the baby at a good height.  You can open the panel to let the legs out.

6 months and older

By the time your baby is 6 months old and sitting up, his spine is strong enough that he doesn't need constant support for his back. He no longer needs to be in the expandable seat and can even put his arms out over the shoulder straps, if he is old enough.

On the hip

From 4 months

As soon as the baby holds his head well, you can start carrying him on your hip. It is an intermediate position giving a little more freedom of movement to the parent than the position on the stomach. Remember that without a baby carrier, we naturally carry the baby with one arm on the hip.

From 6 months

As soon as the baby is in a sitting position. You can also take out his arms above the straps.

On the back

From 6 months of age

As soon as you feel comfortable, you can carry the baby on your back. We recommend that you wait until your baby is 6 months old or until he or she is in a sitting position to avoid the risk of injury or suffocation. Since the weight is well distributed on the back, shoulders and hips, carrying on the back is more comfortable, especially when the child gains weight. It is a practical position to regain greater independence of movement and can be used for as long as you need it. The wearer can use both arms with more freedom and perform activities requiring more strength and skill without risking injury to the child.

Facing the world

From 6 months and up

This carrying position needs your baby to be able to hold his head up by himself. It should be said that this position is not ideal, as it is less ergonomical than tummy-to-tummy and can be overly stimulating for your baby. Should you still like to use this position, keep its use to periods of 20 to 30 minutes at most and regularly verify your baby's blood flow to his legs. This is done by observing the colour of his skin, which should be pinkish rather than blueish. Should his feet get cold, this could also be a sign of difficulties with his blood circulation and you should set him in a different position. Make sure that his back is neither too flat nor too round, thus creating a bad inverted lumbar curve. Finally, his legs should not be hangong too low: to correct his position, tilt his pelvis as far forward as possible to move his knees as high up as possible and deepen his seating. There are two ways to position your baby facing out to the world, either with his legs inside the baby carrier or out and visible on either side.

PöpNgo

Since the baby carrier's fabrics and components have been transported and manipulated several times during manufacturing and its straps more slippery when brand new, the baby carrier should be washed before its first use. We recommend washing it by hand,ideally using no rince soap, or washing it in a laundry bag using your washing machine's delicate cycle. and hanging it to dry. The baby carrier should not be ironed. You can use sucking pads to avoid washing it every day.

Tummy to tummy

0-6 months

The belly-to-belly type carry where the baby adopts a squatting position is the most suitable carrying position for a newborn and up to at least 4 months. The back should have a nice rounded shape like in mom's belly, the knees well up and the feet down. You can practice the skin-to-skin technique with a baby 8 lbs and over, easily and safely. This position offers him the comfort necessary for the development of his feeling of emotional security. The squatting position is recognized for its benefits for the development of the baby's bones and joints. The booster cushion allows you to position the baby between 8 lbs and 12 lbs (3.6-5.5 kg).

6 months and over

From 6 months and when the baby is in a sitting position, his spine is strong enough to no longer need continuous back support. He no longer needs the booster cushion and can even put his arms out above the shoulder straps, if he is big enough.

On the hip

From 4 months

As soon as the baby holds his head well, you can start carrying him on your hip. It is an intermediate position giving a little more freedom of movement to the parent than the position on the belly. Remember that without a baby carrier, we naturally carry the baby with one arm on the hip. Always use the booster cushion until the baby weighs 12 lbs.

From 6 months

As soon as the baby is in a sitting position. You can also take out his arms above the straps.

On the back

From 6 months

As soon as you feel comfortable, you can carry the baby on your back. We advise you to wait until he is 6 months old or that he is in a sitting position to avoid the risk of injury or suffocation. Since the weight is well distributed on the back, shoulders and hips, carrying on the back is more comfortable, especially when the child gains weight. This is a practical position to regain greater freedom of movement and can be used for as long as you need it. The wearer can thus use both arms with more freedom and carry out activities requiring more strength and skill without risking injury to the child.

Facing the world

From 6 months and up

This carrying position needs your baby to be able to hold his head up by himself. It should be said that this position is not ideal, as it is less ergonomical than tummy-to-tummy and can be overly stimulating for your baby. Should you still like to use this position, keep its use to periods of 20 to 30 minutes at most and regularly verify your baby's blood flow to his legs. This is done by observing the colour of his skin, which should be pinkish rather than blueish. Should his feet get cold, this could also be a sign of difficulties with his blood circulation and you should set him in a different position. Make sure that his back is neither too flat nor too round, thus creating a bad inverted lumbar curve. Finally, his legs should not be hangong too low: to correct his position, tilt his pelvis as far forward as possible to move his knees as high up as possible and deepen his seating. There are two ways to position your baby facing out to the world, either with his legs inside the baby carrier or out and visible on either side.

Trek Air-O

Since the baby carrier's fabrics and components have been transported and manipulated several times during manufacturing and its straps more slippery when brand new, the baby carrier should be washed before its first use. We recommend washing it by hand using no rince soap and hanging it to dry. The baby carrier should not be ironed. You can use sucking pads to avoid washing it every day.

Tummy to tummy

0-6 months

Carrying your baby tummy to tummy is a position where the baby is held in a crouched position and is the most adequate method for carrying a newborn at least up to the age of 4 months. Your baby's back is kept well-rounded, as if still in the womb, while his knees are pulled upwards and his feet pointing down. This position is the same as when practicing skin-to-skin with your baby, which becomes possible as soon as he is at least 8 pounds, safely and easily. This crouched position will give him the comfort necessary to his sense of emotional security and is known to be beneficial to the development of his bones and joints. Before 6 months, the stretchy infant seat should be used to support the baby at a good height. Otherwise, you can also use the evolutive belt sold separately.

6 months and up

Starting at 6 months and when your baby can sit by himself, his spine is sturdy enough to no longer need constant back support. When he is tall enough, the newborn seat will no longer be needed and he will even be able to have his arms out above the shoulder straps.

On the hip

4 months and up

You can start carrying your baby on your hip as soon as he can hold up his head. This is an intermediate position which will give both you and your baby greater freedom of movement than on the tummy. Remember that without a baby carrier, we naturally carry a baby by holding him on our hip using one arm.

6 months and up

As soon as your baby can sit by himself. You can also have his arms out and above the shoulder straps.

On the back

6 months and up

As soon as you feel comfortable doing it, your baby can be carried on your back. We nonetheless recommend to wait until he is at least 6 months old or that he can sit by himself so as to avoid all risks of injury or suffocation. With his weight properly distributed on your back, shoulders and hips, this carrying position is more comfortable, especially as he grows and becomes heavier. It will give you more freedom in your activities, allowing you to do more demanding tasks without putting your child at risk.

Baby wraps

Air-O Baby Wrap

Because of the transportation and manipulation required to make a baby wrap, it should always be washed before its first use. We recommend washing it by hand in lukewarm water with a mild soap, ideally a no-rinse soap, or washing it using your machine's gentle cycle in a garmenr bag. Hang to dry and do not iron.

This polyester mesh is also called medical mesh because of its antimicrobial properties and breathability.

The most common and ergonomic way to knot baby wraps to use for longer time periods demand a baby wrap of a regular or extra size (our sizes 6 and 7). If you would like to use specific knot requiring less fabric, size 4 is available online. For an even shorter baby wrap (size 2), please contact us.

The choice of baby wrap size depends on your size rather than the baby's. If you wear clothes sized large or extra-large, you'll be more at ease with our size extra (size 7).

We recommend that you limit the use of the same shoulder to carry your baby. Change shoulders frequently to rest your back. If you choose to use the cradle position, be very careful in its execution, as it presents more risks of suffocation. Keep the baby's face visible at all times. If you prefer the baby to face the world with his legs inside the wrap, know that this position requires more attention, as the baby is at a greater risk of tipping forward.

We recommend that you only use the positions demonstrated in our videos : in the front, on the hip, and on the back, the Kangaroo. For these techniques, you will need a baby wrap sized regular or extra.

Tummy to tummy

From birth

The belly-to-belly type carry where the baby adopts a squatting position is the most suitable carrying position for a newborn and up to at least 4 months. The back should have a nice rounded shape like in mom's belly, the knees well up and the feet down. You can practice the skin-to-skin technique with a baby 8 lbs and over, easily and safely. This position offers him the comfort necessary for the development of his feeling of emotional security. The squatting position is recognized for its benefits for the development of the baby's bones and joints. Before 6 months, avoid applying tension to the middle of the back. There are several knotting techniques that you can perform in order to wrap the baby perfectly and support him in the ideal position according to his stage of development.

From 6 months

From 6 months and when the baby is in a sitting position, his spine is strong enough to no longer need continuous back support. When the baby feels stuck, wants to move or is hot, you can let him out his arms. Simple and easy to do for beginners, we recommend wrapped cross knotting. On the other hand, knots like the kangaroo knot perfectly support the rounded column of the newborn. Check out the videos to see all the options.

On the hip

From 4 months of age

As soon as the baby has a good head hold, you can start carrying him on your hip. This is an intermediate position that gives the parent a little more freedom of movement than the stomach position. Remember that without a sling, we naturally carry the baby with one arm on the hip. When your baby is able to sit up, you can let your baby's arms out over the straps. There are several different knotting techniques for hip carrying, but we suggest the hip-wrapped crossbody knot. This variation of the cross wrap on the belly is easy to achieve. There is also the kangaroo knot on the hip, the hammock with sliding knot or with rings. Check out the videos to see all the options.

On the back

From 6 months of age

As soon as you feel comfortable, you can carry the baby on your back. However, we recommend that you wait until your baby is 6 months old or until he or she is in a sitting position to avoid the risk of injury or suffocation. Because the weight is well distributed on the back, shoulders and hips, carrying on the back is more comfortable, especially when the child gains weight. It is a practical position to regain greater independence of movement and can be used for as long as you need it. The wearer can use both arms with more freedom and perform activities requiring more strength and skill without risking injury to the child. Several knotting techniques are possible for back carrying. We suggest the kangaroo knot because of its ease of execution and the fact that it covers the baby's back well. We also recommend the cross wrap if you are comfortable with the back knot. When done properly, it offers maximum support and comfort.

Facing the world

From 6 months and up

This carrying position needs your baby to be able to hold his head up by himself. It should be said that this position is not ideal, as it is less ergonomical than tummy-to-tummy and can be overly stimulating for your baby. Should you still like to use this position, keep its use to periods of 20 to 30 minutes at most and regularly verify your baby's blood flow to his legs. This is done by observing the colour of his skin, which should be pinkish rather than blueish. Should his feet get cold, this could also be a sign of difficulties with his blood circulation and you should set him in a different position. Make sure that his back is neither too flat nor too round, thus creating a bad inverted lumbar curve. Finally, his legs should not be hangong too low: to correct his position, tilt his pelvis as far forward as possible to move his knees as high up as possible and deepen his seating. There are two ways to position your baby facing out to the world, either with his legs inside the baby wrap or out and visible on either side.

The cradle

From birth

The cradle or the Madonna position is favorable to breastfeeding, but remains a position to be performed with care. You must always be vigilant and make sure that the baby is breathing well and not suffocating. The face should always be visible and you should see enough space between his chin and his chest to slip 2 fingers in. His neck should not be too bent. Although some people do not recommend this position, we recommend that you only do it while the baby is actively feeding and that you return him to the upright position as soon as he falls asleep to help his breathing and digestion. Breastfeeding with your hands free is still something exceptional!

Traditional Woven wrap

Because of the transportation and manipulation required to make a baby wrap, it should always be washed before its first use. A first wash will also help to strengthen the fibres of the textile. We recommend washing it by hand in lukewarm water with a mild soap, ideally a no-rinse soap. Lay flat to dry and do not iron. Avoid sunlight and heat sources to protect its colour.

The weight of the fabric is between 200 and 220 mg/m. They are supple and woven in an even-sided twill, giving it a perfect balance of strength and flexibility to wrap and hold the baby with.

The most common and ergonomic way to knot baby wraps to use for longer periods demand a baby wrap of a regular or extra size (our sizes 6 and 7). If you would like to use a specific knot requiring less fabric, size 4 is available online. For an even shorter baby wrap (size 2), please contact us.
The choice of baby wrap size depends on your size rather than the babies. If you wear clothes sized large or extra-large, you'll be more at ease with our size extra (size 7).

We recommend that you limit the use of the same shoulder to carry your baby. Change shoulders frequently to rest your back. If you choose to use the cradle position, be very careful in its execution, as it presents more risks of suffocation. Keep the baby's face visible at all times. If you prefer the baby to face the world with his legs inside the wrap, know that this position requires more attention, as the baby is at a greater risk of tipping forward.

Tummy to tummy

From birth

The belly-to-belly type carry where the baby adopts a squatting position is the most suitable carrying position for a newborn and up to at least 4 months. The back should have a nice rounded shape like in mom's belly, the knees well up and the feet down. You can practice the skin-to-skin technique with babies 8 lbs and up easily and safely. This position offers him the comfort necessary for the development of his feeling of emotional security. The squatting position is recognized for its benefits for the development of the bones and joints of the baby. Before 6 months, avoid applying tension to the middle of the back. There are several knotting techniques that you can perform in order to wrap the baby perfectly and support him in the ideal position according to his stage of development.

6 months and over

From 6 months and when baby is in a sitting position, their spine is strong enough that they no longer need continual back support. When the baby feels stuck, wants to move or is hot, you can let him out his arms. Simple and easy to do for beginners, we recommend wrapped cross knotting. On the other hand, knots such as the kangaroo knot perfectly support the rounded column of the newborn. Check out the videos to see all the options.

On the hip

From 4 months

As soon as the baby holds his head well, you can start carrying him on your hip. It is an intermediate position giving a little more freedom of movement to the parent than the position on the belly. Remember that without a baby carrier, we naturally carry the baby with one arm on the hip. When your baby is able to sit up, you can let them extend their arms above the shoulder straps. Several knotting techniques are possible for a carry on the hip, but we offer wrapped cross knotting on the hip. This variation of the belly wrap crossover is easy to do. There is also the kangaroo tie on the hip, the hammock with a sliding knot or with rings. Check out the videos to see all the options.

On the back

From 6 months

As soon as you feel comfortable, you can carry the baby on your back. We advise you to wait until he is 6 months old or that he is in a sitting position to avoid the risk of injury or suffocation. The weight being well distributed on the back, shoulders and hips, carrying on the back is more comfortable, especially when the child gains weight. This is a practical position to regain greater freedom of movement and can be used for as long as you need it. The wearer can thus use both arms with more freedom and carry out activities requiring more strength and skill without risking injury to the child. Several knotting techniques are possible for carrying on the back. We suggest the kangaroo knot because of its ease of execution and the fact that it covers the baby's back well. We also recommend the wrapped wrap if you are comfortable with the back tie. When done well, it provides maximum support and comfort.

Facing the world

From 6 months and up

This carrying position needs your baby to be able to hold his head up by himself. It should be said that this position is not ideal, as it is less ergonomical than tummy-to-tummy and can be overly stimulating for your baby. Should you still like to use this position, keep its use to periods of 20 to 30 minutes at most and regularly verify your baby's blood flow to his legs. This is done by observing the colour of his skin, which should be pinkish rather than blueish. Should his feet get cold, this could also be a sign of difficulties with his blood circulation and you should set him in a different position. Make sure that his back is neither too flat nor too round, thus creating a bad inverted lumbar curve. Finally, his legs should not be hangong too low: to correct his position, tilt his pelvis as far forward as possible to move his knees as high up as possible and deepen his seating. There are two ways to position your baby facing out to the world, either with his legs inside the baby wrap or out and visible on either side.

The cradle

From birth

The cradle or Madonna position is favorable for breastfeeding, but remains a position to be performed with care. Always be vigilant and make sure the baby is breathing well and not suffocating. The face must always be visible and you must see enough space between his chin and his torso to slip 2 fingers there. His neck should therefore not be bent too much. Although some people do not recommend this position, we advise you to perform it only while the baby is actively drinking and to put him back in an upright position as soon as he falls asleep to promote his breathing and digestion. Breastfeeding with your hands free is still something exceptional!

Stretchy Wrap

Because of the transportation and manipulation required to make a baby wrap, it should always be washed before its first use. A first wash will also help to strenghten the fibers of the textile. We recommend washing it by hand in lukewarm water with a mild soap, ideally a no-rinse soap. Lay flat to dry and do not iron. Avoid sunlight and heat sources to protect its colour.

Although possible, we do not recommend techniques using a single fabric layer or carrying your baby on your back. We recommend limiting the stretchy wrap's use to carrying on the hip or on your stomach with a classic cross carry knot.

We recommend that you limit the use of the same side to carry your baby. Change shoulders frequently to rest your back. If you choose to use the cradle position, be very careful in its execution, as it presents more risks of suffocation. Keep the baby's face visible at all times. If you prefer the baby to face the world with his legs inside the wrap, know that this position requires more attention, as the baby is at a greater risk of tipping forward.

Tummy to tummy

From birth

The belly-to-belly type carry where the baby adopts a squatting position is the most suitable carrying position with a newborn and up to at least 4 months. The back should have a nice rounded shape like in mom's belly, the knees well up and the feet down. You can practice the skin-to-skin technique with a baby 8 lbs and over, easily and safely. This position offers him the comfort necessary for the development of his feeling of emotional security. The squatting position is recognized for its benefits for the development of the baby's bones and joints. Before 6 months, avoid applying tension to the middle of the back. There are several tying techniques that you can perform to perfectly wrap the baby and support him in the ideal position according to his stage of development.

6 months and over

From 6 months and when the baby is in a sitting position, his spine is strong enough to no longer need continuous back support. When the baby feels stuck, wants to move or is hot, you can let him out his arms. Simple and easy to make for beginners, we favor wrapped cross knotting. On the other hand, knots such as the kangaroo knot perfectly support the rounded column of the newborn. Check out the videos to see all the options.

On the hip

From 4 months

As soon as the baby holds his head well, you can start carrying him on your hip. It is an intermediate position giving a little more freedom of movement to the parent than the position on the belly. Remember that without a baby carrier, we naturally carry the baby with one arm on the hip. When your baby is able to sit up on the floor without support, you can let her arms out above the shoulder straps. Unlike the woven sling, the stretch sling does not support the baby as well. So you have to keep a hand available if he is very fidgety so that the fabric does not slide down and he does not support his back enough to keep him close to you. It is necessary to use the technique of the wrapped crossed on the hip and to tighten well.

Facing the world

From 6 months and up

This carrying position needs your baby to be able to hold his head up by himself. It should be said that this position is not ideal, as it is less ergonomical than tummy-to-tummy and can be overly stimulating for your baby. Should you still like to use this position, keep its use to periods of 20 to 30 minutes at most and regularly verify your baby's blood flow to his legs. This is done by observing the colour of his skin, which should be pinkish rather than blueish. Should his feet get cold, this could also be a sign of difficulties with his blood circulation and you should set him in a different position. Make sure that his back is neither too flat nor too round, thus creating a bad inverted lumbar curve. Finally, his legs should not be hangong too low: to correct his position, tilt his pelvis as far forward as possible to move his knees as high up as possible and deepen his seating. There are two ways to position your baby facing out to the world, either with his legs inside the baby wrap or out and visible on either side. For the safest positioning, we recommend the cross carry technique.

The cradle

From birth

The cradle or Madonna position is favorable for breastfeeding, but remains a position to be performed with care. Always be vigilant and make sure the baby is breathing well and not suffocating. The face must always be visible and you must see enough space between his chin and his torso to slip 2 fingers there. His neck should therefore not be bent too much. Although some people do not recommend this position, we advise you to perform it only while the baby is actively drinking and to put him back in an upright position as soon as he falls asleep to promote his breathing and digestion. Breastfeeding hands-free is still something special!

Superior Woven Wrap

Because of the transportation and manipulation required to make a baby wrap, it should always be washed before its first use. A first wash will also help to strengthen the fibres of the textile. We recommend washing it by hand in lukewarm water with a mild soap, ideally a no-rinse soap. Lay flat to dry and do not iron. Avoid sunlight and heat sources to protect its colour.

The weight of the fabric is between 200 and 220 mg/m. They are supple and woven in an even-sided twill, giving it a perfect balance of strength and flexibility to wrap and hold the baby with.

The most common and ergonomic way to knot baby wraps to use for longer periods demand a baby wrap of a regular or extra size (our sizes 6 and 7). If you would like to use a specific knot requiring less fabric, size 4 is available online. For an even shorter baby wrap (size 2), please contact us.
The choice of baby wrap size depends on your size rather than the babies. If you wear clothes sized large or extra-large, you'll be more at ease with our size extra (size 7).

We recommend that you limit the use of the same shoulder to carry your baby. Change shoulders frequently to rest your back. If you choose to use the cradle position, be very careful in its execution, as it presents more risks of suffocation. Keep the baby's face visible at all times. If you prefer the baby to face the world with his legs inside the wrap, know that this position requires more attention, as the baby is at a greater risk of tipping forward.

Tummy to tummy

0-6 months

Carrying your baby tummy to tummy is a position where the baby is held in a crouched position and is the most adequate method for carrying a newborn at least up to the age of 4 months. Your baby's back is kept well-rounded, as if still in the womb, while his knees are pulled upwards and his feet pointing down. This position is the same as when practicing skin-to-skin with your baby, which becomes possible as soon as he is at least 8 pounds, safely and easily. This crouched position will give him the comfort necessary to his sense of emotional security and is known to be beneficial to the development of his bones and joints. Before the age of 6 months, applying tension in the middle of the baby's back needs to be avoided. There are many tying techniques for you to experiment with to perfectly envelop your baby and support him in the ideal position for his stage of development.

6 months and up

Starting at 6 months and when your baby can sit by himself, his spine is sturdy enough to no longer need constant back support. Should he feel constrained, need to move, or feels too hot, you can allow him to free his arms from the wrap. Early on, we recommend the simplest of wraps, the 'cross carry', so you can gain confidence in the technique and in your skills. Another useful method is the 'Kangaroo', which will perfectly support his spine as a newborn. View our videos to discover all of the wrap's options!

On the hip

4 months and up

You can start carrying your baby on your hip as soon as he can hold up his head. This is an intermediate position which will give both you and your baby greater freedom of movement than on the tummy. Remember that without a baby wrap, we naturally carry a baby by holding him on our hip using one arm. There are many ways to sit your baby on your hip using a baby wrap, but it is recommend using the hip cross carry. The Kagaroo is also a possibility here, as is the hammock, using an adjustable knot or a set of rings. See our videos to review all the options available.

On the back

6 months and up

As soon as you feel comfortable doing it, your baby can be carried on your back. We nonetheless recommend waiting until he is at least 6 months old or that he can sit by himself so as to avoid all risks of injury or suffocation. With his weight properly distributed on your back, shoulders and hips, this carrying position is more comfortable, especially as he grows and becomes heavier. It will give you more freedom in your activities, allowing you to do more demanding tasks without putting your child at risk. Many techniques are available to achieve this, we recommend the Kagaroo due to its simplicity and excellent coverage of the baby's back. Another good option is the cross carry, if you feel comfortable with having the knotting in your back. Its support and comfort are at their maximum when properly executed.

Facing the world

From 6 months and up

This carrying position needs your baby to be able to hold his head up by himself. It should be said that this position is not ideal, as it is less ergonomical than tummy-to-tummy and can be overly stimulating for your baby. Should you still like to use this position, keep its use to periods of 20 to 30 minutes at most and regularly verify your baby's blood flow to his legs. This is done by observing the colour of his skin, which should be pinkish rather than blueish. Should his feet get cold, this could also be a sign of difficulties with his blood circulation and you should set him in a different position. Make sure that his back is neither too flat nor too round, thus creating a bad inverted lumbar curve. Finally, his legs should not be hangong too low: to correct his position, tilt his pelvis as far forward as possible to move his knees as high up as possible and deepen his seating. There are two ways to position your baby facing out to the world, either with his legs inside the baby wrap or out and visible on either side.

The cradle

From birth

Called the Cradle or the Madonna, this position is favourable to breastfeeding, but needs to be executed with precaution. Vigilance is a must, as you will need to keep an eye on the baby's breathing and make sure he's not suffocating. His face must be visible at all times and you should be able to slip two fingers between his chin and torso. His neck should not be overly bent. Some people will not recommend you this position, but we will, with the restriction that it should only be used when the baby is actively feeding and set him vertically again as soon as he's done, so as to help with his digestion and breathing. Breastfeeding hands-free is an exceptional experience!

Snüg

Because of the transportation and manipulation required to make a baby wrap, it should always be washed before its first use. A first wash will also help to strengthen the fibres of the textile. We recommend washing it by hand in lukewarm water with a mild soap, ideally a no-rinse soap. Lay flat to dry and do not iron. Avoid sunlight and heat sources to protect its colour.

Tummy to tummy

From Birth

Carrying your baby tummy to tummy is a position where the baby is held in a crouched position and is the most adequate method for carrying a newborn at least up to the age of 4 months. Your baby's back is kept well-rounded, as if still in the womb, while his knees are pulled upwards and his feet pointing down. This position is the same as when practicing skin-to-skin with your baby, which becomes possible as soon as he is at least 8 pounds, safely and easily. This crouched position will give him the comfort necessary to his sense of emotional security and is known to be beneficial to the development of his bones and joints.

Facing the world

From 6 months and up

This carrying position needs your baby to be able to hold his head up by himself. It should be said that this position is not ideal, as it is less ergonomical than tummy-to-tummy and can be overly stimulating for your baby. Should you still like to use this position, keep its use to periods of 20 to 30 minutes at most and regularly verify your baby's blood flow to his legs. This is done by observing the colour of his skin, which should be pinkish rather than blueish. Should his feet get cold, this could also be a sign of difficulties with his blood circulation and you should set him in a different position. Tilt his pelvis as far forward as possible to move his knees as high up as possible and deepen his seating.

Mei Tai

Mei Tai AIR

Since the baby carrier's fabrics and components have been transported and manipulated several times during manufacturing and its straps more slippery when brand new, the baby carrier should be washed before its first use. We recommend washing it by hand,ideally using no rince soap, or washing it in a garment bag using your washing machine's delicate cycle. and hanging it to dry. The baby carrier should not be ironed.

The Mei Tai Air's front pocket comes in 9 different versions. This means your baby carrier might differ in appearance from the one appearing in this picture. These baby carriers are all artisanally made in Canada. In any case, each of them is beautiful.

Tummy to tummy

0-6 months

Carrying your baby tummy to tummy is a position where the baby is held in a crouched position and is the most adequate method for carrying a newborn at least up to the age of 4 months. Your baby's back is kept well-rounded, as if still in the womb, while his knees are pulled upwards and his feet pointing down. This position is the same as when practicing skin-to-skin with your baby, which becomes possible as soon as he is at least 8 pounds, safely and easily. This crouched position will give him the comfort necessary to his sense of emotional security and is known to be beneficial to the development of his bones and joints. From 0-1 months you can leave baby’s legs folded inside the baby carrier. Before the age of 6 months, applying tension in the middle of the baby's back needs to be avoided. Deploy the shouldres straps like a sling around the baby's bottom.

6 mois et plus

À partir de 6 mois et lorsque le bébé se tient en position assise, sa colonne vertébrale est assez forte pour ne plus avoir besoin d’un support continuel au niveau du dos. ll peut même sortir ses bras au-dessus des bretelles, s’il est assez grand.

On the hip

4 months and up

You can start carrying your baby on your hip as soon as he can hold up his head. This is an intermediate position which will give both you and your baby greater freedom of movement than on the tummy. Remember that without a baby carrier, we naturally carry a baby by holding him on our hip using one arm.

6 months and up

As soon as your baby can sit by himself. You can also have his arms out and above the shoulder straps.

On the back

6 months and up

As soon as you feel comfortable doing it, your baby can be carried on your back. We nonetheless recommend to wait until he is at least 6 months old or that he can sit by himself so as to avoid all risks of injury or suffocation. With his weight properly distributed on your back, shoulders and hips, this carrying position is more comfortable, especially as he grows and becomes heavier. It will give you more freedom in your activities, allowing you to do more demanding tasks without putting your child at risk.

Facing the world

From 6 months and up

This carrying position needs your baby to be able to hold his head up by himself. It should be said that this position is not ideal, as it is less ergonomical than tummy-to-tummy and can be overly stimulating for your baby. Should you still like to use this position, keep its use to periods of 20 to 30 minutes at most and regularly verify your baby's blood flow to his legs. This is done by observing the colour of his skin, which should be pinkish rather than blueish. Should his feet get cold, this could also be a sign of difficulties with his blood circulation and you should set him in a different position. Make sure that his back is neither too flat nor too round, thus creating a bad inverted lumbar curve. Finally, his legs should not be hangong too low: to correct his position, tilt his pelvis as far forward as possible to move his knees as high up as possible and deepen his seating. There are two ways to position your baby facing out to the world, either with his legs inside the baby carrier or out and visible on either side.

Mei Tai MAX

Since the baby carrier's fabrics and components have been transported and manipulated several times during manufacturing and its straps more slippery when brand new, the baby carrier should be washed before its first use. We recommend washing it by hand,ideally using no rince soap, or washing it in a garment bag using your washing machine's delicate cycle. and hanging it to dry. The baby carrier should not be ironed.

The Mei Tai's front pocket comes in 9 different versions. This means your baby carrier might differ in appearance from the one appearing in this picture. These baby carriers are all artisanally made in Canada. In any case, each of them is beautiful.

Tummy to tummy

0-6 months

Carrying your baby tummy to tummy is a position where the baby is held in a crouched position and is the most adequate method for carrying a newborn at least up to the age of 4 months. Your baby's back is kept well-rounded, as if still in the womb, while his knees are pulled upwards and his feet pointing down. This position is the same as when practicing skin-to-skin with your baby, which becomes possible as soon as he is at least 8 pounds, safely and easily. This crouched position will give him the comfort necessary to his sense of emotional security and is known to be beneficial to the development of his bones and joints. From 0-1 months you can leave baby’s legs folded inside the baby carrier. Before the age of 6 months, applying tension in the middle of the baby's back needs to be avoided. Deploy the shouldres straps like a sling around the baby's bottom.

6 months and up

Starting at 6 months and when your baby can sit by himself, his spine is sturdy enough to no longer need constant back support. When he is tall enough, the newborn seat will

On the hip

4 months and up

You can start carrying your baby on your hip as soon as he can hold up his head. This is an intermediate position which will give both you and your baby greater freedom of movement than on the tummy. Remember that without a baby carrier, we naturally carry a baby by holding him on our hip using one arm.

6 months and up

As soon as your baby can sit by himself. You can also have his arms out and above the shoulder straps.

On the back

6 months and up

As soon as you feel comfortable doing it, your baby can be carried on your back. We nonetheless recommend to wait until he is at least 6 months old or that he can sit by himself so as to avoid all risks of injury or suffocation. With his weight properly distributed on your back, shoulders and hips, this carrying position is more comfortable, especially as he grows and becomes heavier. It will give you more freedom in your activities, allowing you to do more demanding tasks without putting your child at risk.

Facing the world

From 6 months and up

This carrying position needs your baby to be able to hold his head up by himself. It should be said that this position is not ideal, as it is less ergonomical than tummy-to-tummy and can be overly stimulating for your baby. Should you still like to use this position, keep its use to periods of 20 to 30 minutes at most and regularly verify your baby's blood flow to his legs. This is done by observing the colour of his skin, which should be pinkish rather than blueish. Should his feet get cold, this could also be a sign of difficulties with his blood circulation and you should set him in a different position. Make sure that his back is neither too flat nor too round, thus creating a bad inverted lumbar curve. Finally, his legs should not be hangong too low: to correct his position, tilt his pelvis as far forward as possible to move his knees as high up as possible and deepen his seating. There are two ways to position your baby facing out to the world, either with his legs inside the baby carrier or out and visible on either side.

Ring Sling

Gathered Ring sling

Because of the transportation and manipulation required to make a baby wrap, it should always be washed before its first use. A first wash will also help to strenghten the fibers of the textile. We recommend washing it by hand in lukewarm water with a mild soap, ideally a no-rinse soap. Lay flat to dry and do not iron. Avoid sunlight and heat sources to protect its colour.

The weight of the fabric is between 200 and 220 mg/m. They are supple and woven in an even-sided twill, giving it a perfect balance of strenght and flexibility to wrap and hold the baby with.

The choice of baby wrap size depends on your size rather than the baby's. If you wear clothes sized large or extra-large, you'll be more at ease with our size 2.

We recommend that you limit the use of the same side to carry your baby. Change shoulders frequently to rest your back. If you choose to use the cradle position, be very careful in its execution, as it presents more risks of suffocation. Keep the baby's face visible at all times. If you prefer the baby to face the world with his legs inside the wrap, know that this position requires more attention, as the baby is at a greater risk of tipping forward.

Tummy to tummy

0-6 months

Carrying your baby tummy to tummy is a position where the baby is held in a crouched position and is the most adequate method for carrying a newborn at least up to the age of 4 months. Your baby's back is kept well-rounded, as if still in the womb, while his knees are pulled upwards and his feet pointing down. This position is the same as when practicing skin-to-skin with your baby, which becomes possible as soon as he is at least 8 pounds, safely and easily. This crouched position will give him the comfort necessary to his sense of emotional security and is known to be beneficial to the development of his bones and joints. Before the age of 6 months, applying tension in the middle of the baby's back needs to be avoided. There are many tying techniques for you to experiment with to perfectly envelop your baby and support him in the ideal position for his stage of development.

6 months and up

Starting at 6 months and when your baby can sit by himself, his spine is sturdy enough to no longer need constant back support. Should he feel constrained, need to move, or feels too hot, you can allow him to free his arms from the wrap. Early on, we recommend the simplest of wraps, the 'cross carry', so you can gain confidence in the technique and in your skills. Another useful method is the 'Kangaroo', which will perfectly support his spine as a newborn. View our videos to discover all of the wrap's options!

On the hip

4 months and up

You can start carrying your baby on your hip as soon as he can hold up his head. This is an intermediate position which will give both you and your baby greater freedom of movement than on the tummy. Remember that without a baby wrap, we naturally carry a baby by holding him on our hip using one arm. There are many ways to sit your baby on your hip using a baby wrap, but recommend using the hip cross carry. The Kagaroo is also a possibility here, as is the hammock, using an adjustable knot or a set of rings. See our videos to review all the options available.

On the back

6 months and up

A ring sling is not the safest means to carry a baby on your back due to the lack of support to the baby. It should only be used in very short periods of time when you momentarily need extra freedom of movement. As soon as you're done with the task, we recommend that you bring your baby back onto your hip or stomach.

Facing the world

From 6 months and up

This carrying position needs your baby to be able to hold his head up by himself. It should be said that this position is not ideal, as it is less ergonomical than tummy-to-tummy and can be overly stimulating for your baby. Should you still like to use this position, keep its use to periods of 20 to 30 minutes at most and regularly verify your baby's blood flow to his legs. This is done by observing the colour of his skin, which should be pinkish rather than blueish. Should his feet get cold, this could also be a sign of difficulties with his blood circulation and you should set him in a different position. Make sure that his back is neither too flat nor too round, thus creating a bad inverted lumbar curve. Finally, his legs should not be hangong too low: to correct his position, tilt his pelvis as far forward as possible to move his knees as high up as possible and deepen his seating. There are two ways to position your baby facing out to the world, either with his legs inside the baby wrap or out and visible on either side.

The cradle

From birth

Called the Cradle or the Madonna, this position is favourable to breastfeeding, but needs to be executed with precaution. Vigilance is a must, as you will need to keep an eye on the baby's breathing and make sure he's not suffocating. His face must be visible at all times and you should be able to slip two fingers between his chin and torso. His neck should not be overly bent. Some people will not recommend you this position, but we will, with the restriction that it should only be used when the baby is actively feeding and set him vertically again as soon as he's done, so as to help with his digestion and breathing. Breastfeeding hands-free is an exceptional experience!

Ring Sling Air-O

Because of the transportation and manipulation required to make a baby wrap, it should always be washed before its first use. We recommend washing it by hand in lukewarm water with a mild soap, ideally a no-rinse soap, or washing it using your machine's gentle cycle in a garmenr bag. Hang to dry and do not iron.

The Ring sling Air-O's polyester mesh is also called medical mesh because of its antimicrobial properties and breathability.

The choice of baby wrap size depends on your size rather than the baby's. If you wear clothes sized large or extra-large, you'll be more at ease with our size 2.

We recommend that you limit the use of the same side to carry your baby. Change shoulders frequently to rest your back. If you choose to use the cradle position, be very careful in its execution, as it presents more risks of suffocation. Keep the baby's face visible at all times. If you prefer the baby to face the world with his legs inside the wrap, know that this position requires more attention, as the baby is at a greater risk of tipping forward.

Tummy to tummy

0-6 months

Carrying your baby tummy to tummy is a position where the baby is held in a crouched position and is the most adequate method for carrying a newborn at least up to the age of 4 months. Your baby's back is kept well-rounded, as if still in the womb, while his knees are pulled upwards and his feet pointing down. This position is the same as when practicing skin-to-skin with your baby, which becomes possible as soon as he is at least 8 pounds, safely and easily. This crouched position will give him the comfort necessary to his sense of emotional security and is known to be beneficial to the development of his bones and joints. Before the age of 6 months, applying tension in the middle of the baby's back needs to be avoided. There are many tying techniques for you to experiment with to perfectly envelop your baby and support him in the ideal position for his stage of development.

6 months and up

Starting at 6 months and when your baby can sit by himself, his spine is sturdy enough to no longer need constant back support. Should he feel constrained, need to move, or feels too hot, you can allow him to free his arms from the wrap. Early on, we recommend the simplest of wraps, the 'cross carry', so you can gain confidence in the technique and in your skills. Another useful method is the 'Kangaroo', which will perfectly support his spine as a newborn. View our videos to discover all of the ring sling's options !

On the hip

3 months and up

You can start carrying your baby on your hip as soon as he can hold up his head. This is an intermediate position which will give both you and your baby greater freedom of movement than on the tummy. Remember that without a baby wrap, we naturally carry a baby by holding him on our hip using one arm. There are many ways to sit your baby on your hip using a baby wrap, but recommend using the hip cross carry. The Kagaroo is also a possibility here, as is the hammock, using an adjustable knot or a set of rings. See our videos to review all the options available.